Categorías
Analítica Web Google Analytics Universal Analytics

Universal Analytics Plugin Online Hackathon – Dual tracking

https://m4p.es/universal-analytics-plugin-online-hackathon-dual-tracking/ Universal Analytics Plugin Online Hackathon – Dual tracking 2016-04-28 19:59:33 admin Blog post Analítica Web Google Analytics Universal Analytics accont

I’ve been thinking about doing a Google Analytics related hackaton for a long time. Some months ago, I started to take a look about how Universal Analytics Plugins work and I decided that coding a plugin to all the data to a secondary property using just a plugin would be a real nice example.

For years now, I’ve sharing a lot of code that I’ve worked on, some tracking ideas too, but still I don’t consider myself a developer, if i must say it, I really think that I really suck at programming even if I can do some stuff myself.

So here I am trying to organize an online Universal Analytics Hackaton. I hope this can turn on a great change to learn from other people, and understand how plugins work!!!

Of course you may be asking what’s a “Hackathon” (don’t be shy about asking). Let’s quote the Wikipedia:

A hackathon (also known as a hack day, hackfest or codefest) is an event in which computer programmers and others involved in software development and hardware development, including graphic designers, interface designers and project managers, collaborate intensively on software projects. Occasionally, there is a hardware component as well. Hackathons typically last between a day and a week. Some hackathons are intended simply for educational or social purposes, although in many cases the goal is to create usable software. Hackathons tend to have a specific focus, which can include the programming language used, the operating system, an application, an API, or the subject and the demographic group of the programmers. In other cases, there is no restriction on the type of software being created.

GitHub Repository:

https://github.com/thyngster/universal-analytics-dual-tracking-plugin

For now I’ve pushed to the repository  with some “core” code, that “already” works.

How to load the plugin:

ga('create', 'UA-286304-123', 'auto');
ga('require', 'dualtracking', 'http://www.yourdomain.com/js/dualtracking.js', {
    property: 'UA-123123123213-11',
    debug: true,
    transport: 'image'
});
ga('dualtracking:doDualTracking');
ga('send', 'pageview');

Some stuff you need to take in mind when loading a plugin in Google Analytics:

  • The plugin needs to be hosted within your domain
  • It needs to be “initialized” AFTER the “create” method call and BEFORE the “pageview” method.
  • If for some reason the plugin crashes it may affect your data collection, please don’t use this in production before it has been fully tested.

Still it needs to be improved, for example:

  1. We don’t want to use global variables
  2. Payload size check, and based on the results send a POST or GET request
  3. Add XHR transport method
  4. Code cleanup/Best practises
  5. Plugin option to send a local copy for the hits
  6. Better debug messages
  7. Name convention improvement
  8. Any other idea?

Anyone is welcome to push code, add ideas, give testing feedback, through the Github repository or the comments on this blog post.

 

 

 

 

Categorías
Analítica Web Google Tag Manager Universal Analytics

Keep your dataLayer integrity safe using Custom JavaScripts in Google Tag Manager

https://m4p.es/keep-your-datalayer-integrity-safe-using-custom-javascripts-in-google-tag-manager/ Keep your dataLayer integrity safe using Custom JavaScripts in Google Tag Manager 2016-04-04 20:19:10 admin Blog post Analítica Web Google Tag Manager Universal Analytics accont

In JavaScript when you want to copy an object into another variable is not an easy as doing var myVar = myObjectVar; and you should be really careful when working with your dataLayer info in your customHtml Tags and your Custom Javascript Variables.

Let’s try to explain this is the best way I can. When  you’re doing that you’re not copying the current object data to a new variable but instead you’re pointing your new variable to the object one.

What does this mean?, that if that you change a value into your new variable that change will be reflected in the original one. Let’s see an example:

var OriginalData = {'a': 1, 'b':2};
var CopiedData = OriginalData;

CopiedData.a = "MEC!";

console.log("Old 'a' Value: ", OriginalData.a);

Before trying it in your browser console, could you please think what will be “mydata.a” value printed into the console?. If you’re thinking on a “1” value I’m sorry to say that you’re wrong:

 

You may be thinking, why “OriginalData.a” has changed if we only modified the value for our “CopiedData” object.

In programming you we can pass the data in 2 ways:

Call-by-value: This means that the data from the original variable will be copied/cloned into the new variable. 

Call-by-reference or Pass-by-reference: This means that the data on the new variable will be a pointer/reference to the original varialbe one. So if we want to print CopiedData.a , instead of returning a value, it will go to get the value to OriginalData.a (where CopiedData.a POINTS TO) .

How the data is passed in the different programming language is specific to each language, but let’s take a look on how JavaScript does it. Basically any variable type but the object will be called by value. If we do the same example as above, but instead of using an object we use a integer, we’ll be getting a different behaviour.

var OriginalData = 1
var CopiedData = OriginalData;

CopiedData = "MEC!";

console.log("Original Object 'a' Value: ", OriginalData);
console.log("Copied Object 'a' Value: ", CopiedData);

 

As you can see if the variable to be “cloned” is not an object, it will be “passed by value“.

So we need to take in mind that we may be overwriting the original object values. When working with GTM variables, this may equal with updating the original dataLayer values.

There’s not any in-built way to do a deep copy of an object in JavaScript. As we’re mostly refering to data, we could just stringify our object and then parse it again ( never use eval() for converting ).

So when trying to make a copy of some object from the dataLayer (for example when working on a Enhanced Ecommerce implementation and using variables to feed our hits). I would recomend doing it this way:

var ecommerce = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify({{ecommerce}}));

This will only work for objects not including functions/date values/etc. Just plain data. But for now it will keep our dataLayer integrity safe.

Just googleing a bit, you’ll find some functions around to make a full deep copy of an object, but we’re just working with data, so we’re not going to cover that at the moment.

Categorías
Configuración Avanzada configuracion de google analytics Custom Dimensions Dimensiones Personalizadas Google Analytics Google Tag Manager Herramientas Universal Analytics

Envío de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager

https://m4p.es/envio-de-dimensiones-personalizadas-con-google-tag-manager/ Envío de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager 2013-10-18 07:00:00 admin Blog post Configuración Avanzada configuracion de google analytics Custom Dimensions Dimensiones Personalizadas Google Analytics Google Tag Manager Herramientas Universal Analytics bootstrap

Hace un par de semanas se celebró en Mountain View el Google Analytics Summit 2013_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf289f30c»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»el Google Analytics Summit 2013″,»Page»:»Envu00edo de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager»}]);, donde se presentaron las nuevas funcionalidades que nos iremos encontrando en las distintas herramientas de Google durante los próximos meses. En el caso particular de Google Tag Manager, nos explicaron que a partir de ahora será posible configurar el lanzamiento automático de eventos sin tocar ni una línea de código y que dispondrá de un SLA (Service Level Agreement) para los clientes de Google Analytics Premium. En los próximos días compartiremos más detalles sobre esas y el resto de novedades del Summit, así que estad atentos!

Después del post sobre cómo funciona Google Tag Manager_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf289f3f0″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»cu00f3mo funciona Google Tag Manager»,»Page»:»Envu00edo de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager»}]); y tras explicar cómo hacer el seguimiento de eventos_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf289f4c0″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»seguimiento de eventos»,»Page»:»Envu00edo de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager»}]);, hoy le toca el turno a la recopilación y envío de dimensiones personalizadas.

Ante todo, me gustaría hacer hincapié una vez más en que el hecho de utilizar un sistema de Tag Management no siempre es sinónimo de simplicidad. Ya lo explicó en su día Oriol Farré en el artículo de los 10 mitos sobre Google Tag Manager_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf289f596″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»10 mitos sobre Google Tag Manager»,»Page»:»Envu00edo de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager»}]);, y creo que esta ocasión es especialmente oportuna para recordar que la implementación de una herramienta de medición a través de un sistema de Tag Management también conlleva cierta complejidad.

Dicho esto, intentaré que este post sirva para dar algo de luz sobre algunos de los métodos que podemos utilizar a la hora de recopilar dimensiones personalizadas de Google Analytics (o custom dimensions) a través de Google Tag Manager.

A modo de ejemplo, vamos a suponer que necesitamos obtener los siguientes datos de un sitio web para su posterior envío a Google Analytics:

  • Sección del sitio web = Productos
  • Subsección = Camisetas
  • Tipo usuario = Anónimo

Definición de las custom dimensions

Lo primero que haremos será definir las tres dimensiones personalizadas con las que vamos a trabajar. Para ello, accederemos a la sección de Administración de nuestra cuenta de Google Analytics y configuraremos las dimensiones anteriores: Admin > Custom Definitions > Custom Dimensions > New Custom Dimension

Dimensiones personalizadas en Google Analytics

Dimensiones personalizadas en Google Analytics

Ahora que ya tenemos creadas las variables, explicaremos las diferentes alternativas mediante las cuales podremos asignarles un valor a las mismas utilizando Google Tag Manager.

Método 1: Data Layer

El Data Layer es un objeto a través del cual se puede definir la información a enviar utilizando el par ‘nombre’: ‘valor’ y separándolo por comas tantas veces como sea necesario.

<script>
dataLayer = [{
   'nombre1': 'valor1',
   'nombre2': 'valor2',
   ...
   'nombreN': 'valorN'
}];
</script>

 

Para implementar nuestro ejemplo, antes de meter las manos en el código tendríamos que acceder a Google Tag Manager y configurar el tag de Google Analytics de la siguiente forma:

Google Tag Manager

Definir la macro “Secciones del site” dentro del tag de Universal Analytics:

Google Tag Manager

Google Tag Managert

Y lo mismo con las macros “Subsecciones” y “Tipo de usuario”:

Google Tag Manager

Google Tag Manager

Como veis, se trata simplemente de crear un nuevo tag de Universal Analytics_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf289f676″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Universal Analytics»,»Page»:»Envu00edo de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager»}]); y posteriormente definir tres macros (una para cada dimensión) de tipo Data Layer.

Una vez finalizada la configuración, sólo nos faltaría incluir el propio Data Layer en el código de la página en la que vamos a recopilar los datos:

<script>
dataLayer = [{
   'seccion': 'Productos',
   'subseccion': 'Camisetas',
   'tipo_usuario': 'Anonimo'
}];
</script>

 

Finalmente, incluyendo este mismo Data Layer en todo el sitio web (obviamente, en cada caso con los valores que correspondan), ya tendríamos todo listo para recopilar la sección, la subsección y el tipo de usuario que navega por el site.

Método 2: Variables Javascript

Esta segunda opción consiste en utilizar variables Javascript (nuevas o ya existentes en el código) para asignarle valores a las dimensiones personalizadas de Google Analytics.

Para ello, lo primero que debemos hacer es indicar en el Tag Manager que las macros en este caso serán de tipo “Javascript Variable” (sólo muestro la macro “Secciones”, pero habría que hacerlo con las tres):

Google Tag Manager

Al igual que en el caso del Data Layer, sólo nos faltaría incluir las variables Javascript que hemos definido o asegurarnos de que ya existan y tomen los valores correspondientes:

<script>
   var seccion = “Productos”;
   var subseccion = “Camisetas”;
   var tipo_usuario = “Registrado”;
</script>

 

Método 3: Elementos del DOM

El último método que explicaremos en este post consiste en la utilización de elementos del DOM_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf289f73b»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»DOM»,»Page»:»Envu00edo de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager»}]);.

Para este ejemplo, vamos a suponer que disponemos de los siguientes elementos en el código HTML (migas de pan y estado del usuario):

Estás en:
<ul id="breadcrumb">
<li id="section"><a href="productos.html" title="Productos">Productos</a></li> |
<li id="current">Camisetas</li>
</ul>
<p>Hola <span id="userType">Anónimo</span>. <a href="login.php" title="Identificate">Identificate</a></p>

 

De esta forma, tendríamos todo lo necesario para definir nuestras tres dimensiones personalizadas en Google Tag Manager y ya no necesitaríamos tocar nada en el código fuente.

La configuración asociada sería en este caso la siguiente:

Macro “Secciones del site”:
Google Tag Manager

Macro “Subsecciones”:

Google Tag Manager

Macro “Tipo usuario”:

Google Tag Managert

Lo que hemos hecho es decirle a Google Tag Manager que:

  • Las secciones del site deben tomar el valor del elemento del DOM cuyo id es “section” => Secciones del site = “Productos”.
  • Las subsecciones deberán tomar el valor del elemento del DOM cuyo id es “current” => Subsecciones = “Camisetas”.
  • El tipo de usuario tomará el valor del elemento del DOM cuyo id es “userType” => Tipo usuario = “Anónimo”.

Alternativamente, podríamos utilizar el valor de un atributo HTML_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf289f90e»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»atributo HTML»,»Page»:»Envu00edo de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager»}]); en lugar de obtener directamente el texto asociado al elemento del DOM. Un ejemplo de dicho escenario lo podríamos encontrar en el siguiente código:

[...]
<li id="section"><a href="productos.html" title="Productos">Productos</a></li>
[...]

Google Tag Manager

En este caso, le hemos dicho a Google Tag Manager que las secciones del site se deben alimentar del valor del atributo “title” (es decir, “Productos”) del elemento cuyo id es “section”.

Está claro que tenemos varias opciones a nuestra disposición a la hora de asignarle valores a las dimensiones personalizadas. En la gran mayoría de los casos, la clave es tener una buena comunicación con el equipo de IT para decidir conjuntamente cuál (o cuáles, porque se pueden combinar) de estas alternativas es la que mejor se adapta a las particularidades del sitio web o del CMS y con las necesidades de personalización en la recopilación de datos que se plantean desde el equipo de negocio.

Como siempre, espero que este post os resulte útil y que nos contéis vuestra experiencia :)

 

Envío de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf289fa20″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Envu00edo de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager»,»Page»:»Envu00edo de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager»}]); es un post de Trucos Google Analytics_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf289fae7″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Trucos Google Analytics»,»Page»:»Envu00edo de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager»}]);.

The post Envío de dimensiones personalizadas con Google Tag Manager appeared first on Trucos Google Analytics.


Source: http://feeds.feedburner.com/TrucosGoogleAnalytics-Optimizer

Categorías
Google Analytics Novedades Universal Analytics

Más allá de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso práctico

https://m4p.es/mas-alla-de-la-web-con-universal-analytics-caso-practico/ Más allá de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso práctico 2013-03-27 10:17:57 admin Blog post Google Analytics Novedades Universal Analytics bootstrap

Desde el pasado viernes, Universal Analytics está disponible en fase beta para todos los usuarios de Google Analytics. Con este anuncio de Google_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf290fe19″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»este anuncio de Google»,»Page»:»Mu00e1s allu00e1 de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso pru00e1ctico»}]);  llega una nueva herramienta para dotar a las empresas de un sistema de medición del negocio de forma global que permite analizar datos de negocio más allá de la web y de la red de Google.

 Universal Analytics

Universal Analytics fue lanzado el pasado mes de octubre_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf290fefc»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»octubre»,»Page»:»Mu00e1s allu00e1 de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso pru00e1ctico»}]); como un producto beta pensado principalmente para los usuarios de nivel empresarial de Google Analytics. Dispone de una API que hace posible la integración de datos offline en nuestro Google Analytics y combinar el tracking on y offline. Esto significa que si las empresas quieren agregar sus propias métricas personalizadas de sus campañas de marketing offline, visitas a tiendas físicas o incluso registros de llamadas a sus call center, ahora lo podrán hacer.

Repasa esta y otras de las principales propiedades de Universal Analytics tal y como te lo contábamos en el artículo de Barbara Posila _kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf290ffda»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»el artu00edculo de Barbara Posilau00a0″,»Page»:»Mu00e1s allu00e1 de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso pru00e1ctico»}]);en este blog y algunas de las reflexiones de Pere Rovira en el blog de Webanalytics.es_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf29100a9″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»reflexiones de Pere Rovira en el blog de Webanalytics.es»,»Page»:»Mu00e1s allu00e1 de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso pru00e1ctico»}]); alrededor de las novedades y cambio de paradigma que supone.

Utilizando Universal Analytics más allá de la red: 2 ejemplos prácticos

¿Alguna vez habías pensado trackear algo que no fuera tu site usando Google Analytics? Cómo decíamos una de las principales virtudes es la posibilidad de conectar datos más allá de la web. Veamos a continuación 2 ejemplos prácticos.

1) Haz volar tu imaginación con este primer ejemplo en forma de vídeo de nuestro compañero de la delegación de Londres, Ed _kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2910173″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Edu00a0″,»Page»:»Mu00e1s allu00e1 de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso pru00e1ctico»}]);Brocklebank_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2910243″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Brocklebank»,»Page»:»Mu00e1s allu00e1 de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso pru00e1ctico»}]);. El vídeo, que ha causado sensación en las redes, nos muestra un experimento práctico conectando un interruptor y un sensor a una versión de Universal Analytics de Google. ¿El resultado? Cada vez que se acciona el interruptor de encendido o apagado, o se activa el sensor, los datos se registran en Google Analytics.

Puedes ver todos los detalles técnicos en este artículo publicado en el blog de Elisa Dbi_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2910332″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»este artu00edculo publicado en el blog de Elisa Dbi»,»Page»:»Mu00e1s allu00e1 de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso pru00e1ctico»}]);.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhtvARycqGM]

¿Qué beneficios tiene esto? Pues, hay muchos y muy importantes. Ahora podremos entender de una manera más fácil cuál es la convergencia de negocio offline y online. Por ejemplo, contar todas las personas que entran y salen de una tienda y analizar las que han comprado al final, tanto offline como online. Un análisis muy potente, sin duda.

2) El segundo ejemplo práctico tiene que ver con la meteorología. ¿Alguna vez has querido crear un informe que muestre si el clima está afectando a las ventas de tu e-commerce? ¿La tasa de conversión aumenta cuando hace sol? ¿La gente pasa más tiempo de navegación cuando está lloviendo y no pueden salir a la calle?

Este tutorial _kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf291040a»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»tutorialu00a0″,»Page»:»Mu00e1s allu00e1 de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso pru00e1ctico»}]);de Ed Brocklebank  nos muestra cómo crear un informe de este tipo utilizando Universal Analytics de Google.

En síntesis, estamos hablando de conectar el mundo “real” con el “virtual”. Si has tenido muchas visitas a las tiendas físicas, puedes ver qué repercusión tiene en el negocio online. ¿La gente va a las tiendas sólo a curiosear y luego compra online? o no existe ninguna relación entre off y online? ¿Los días de sol o de lluvia nos afectan? Unos datos que pueden ser muy valiosos para tu negocio y que sin duda no puedes menospreciar!

Trucos Google Analytics te seguirá contando más novedades sobre Universal Analytics. Por ahora, haznos saber tu opinión y experiencias en los comentarios. ;)

Más allá de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso práctico_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf29104fc»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Mu00e1s allu00e1 de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso pru00e1ctico»,»Page»:»Mu00e1s allu00e1 de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso pru00e1ctico»}]); es un post de Trucos Google Analytics_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf29105d2″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Trucos Google Analytics»,»Page»:»Mu00e1s allu00e1 de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso pru00e1ctico»}]);.

The post Más allá de la Web con Universal Analytics. Caso práctico appeared first on Trucos Google Analytics.


Source: http://feeds.feedburner.com/TrucosGoogleAnalytics-Optimizer

Categorías
Analytics.js Implementar Google Analytics Reflexiones remarketing Universal Analytics Variables Personalizadas

Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics

https://m4p.es/se-acercan-tiempos-interesantes-para-google-analytics/ Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics 2012-12-10 06:00:54 admin Blog post Analytics.js Implementar Google Analytics Reflexiones remarketing Universal Analytics Variables Personalizadas bootstrap

Son tiempos revueltos para Google Analytics. La plataforma está evolucionando muy rápidamente y creo que incluso a los propios ingenieros de Google les está costando seguir el ritmo. Con la nueva versión de Google Analytics, Universal Analytics, y su Analytics.js_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2946da9″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Analytics.js»,»Page»:»Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics»}]); dejan atrás todo lo que fue en su momento Urchin. Ya se despidieron hace un año de la antigua interfaz, herencia de Urchin, con la introducción de la versión 5 de Google Analytics, en la que Google aseguraba que podrían añadir nuevas funcionalidades de forma mucho más fácil y rápida, tal y como hemos podido comprobar estos últimos meses, en los que no han parado de ampliar las funcionalidades de GA.

_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2946e99″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»«,»Page»:»Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics»}]);

Ahora le ha llegado el turno a la parte interna, la que nadie ve: el sistema de recolección de datos. Urchin, la herramienta que compró Google hace unos años, estaba pensada para trabajar con webs pequeñas y medianas a nivel de volumen y Google Analytics no ha sido capaz de adaptarlo a los grandes volúmenes que tienen webs como Softonic_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2946f6a»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Softonic»,»Page»:»Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics»}]);, Airbnb_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2947056″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Airbnb»,»Page»:»Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics»}]); o twitter_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf294711c»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»twitter»,»Page»:»Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics»}]); (por poner 3 ejemplos internacionales) que tienen millones de visitas al mes (o incluso al día!). Estas limitaciones empiezan en el formato del código JavaScript, que dificultan la implementación y limitan mucho su potencia, pero el punto débil es la forma en la almacenan los datos, ya que es allí dónde aparece el problema real de Google Analytics: el sampling.

Auguro un gran futuro para Google Analytics. Será una herramienta mucho mejor de lo que es ahora mismo, con menos sampling (o quien sabe, a lo mejor acaba desapareciendo!) y mucho más rápida y flexible, poniéndose a la altura o incluso superando en algunos aspectos a otras herramientas de pago como Adobe Analytics (de la que creo sinceramente que se han inspirado para hacer el nuevo analytics).

El problema que veo ahora mismo es el tiempo que tendremos que esperar hasta que llegue este nuevo Súper Google Analytics, ya que estaremos un poco perdidos.

Si tenemos en cuenta que ya se puede empezar a probar Analytics.js en beta (podéis ver el código en éste mismo blog), actualmente tenemos 3 formas de implementar Google Analytics (en una web):

  • Google Analytics estándar: Es el código “de toda la vida”, el que tenemos puesto en prácticamente todas nuestras webs y que, desde hace un tiempo tiene incorporado Content Experiments. Cuando creamos una nueva cuenta en Google Analytics, es el código que nos ofrecen.
  • _kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf29471f9″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»«,»Page»:»Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics»}]);Listas de Remarketing: una gran funcionalidad que han añadido es la posibilidad de utilizar los segmentos de Google Analytics para definir los targets de las campañas de display. Es una funcionalidad brutal pero si la queremos utilizar deberemos cambiar la implementación de Google Analytics, ya que no se puede utilizar con el JavaScript estándar. Por lo tanto, deberemos cambiar el fichero ga.js por el fichero dc.js (Justin Cutroni nos explica al detalle como hacerlo_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf29472c4″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Justin Cutroni nos explica al detalle como hacerlo»,»Page»:»Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics»}]);). Además, el problema no sólo está en el cambio de js, sino que al activar ésta funcionalidad dejaremos de tener disponible el Content Experiments.
  • Analytics.js La tercera opción, la más potente, nos permitirá integrar varios dispositivos, tendremos una gestión integral desde el servidor, sin necesidad de hacer cambios en el código, podremos importar datos externos directamente en la herramienta y aumentaremos el límite de las variables personalizadas de 5 a 20, que pasan a llamarse custom dimensions (son muy parecidas a las eVars de Adobe Analytics). A cambio, no tendremos integración de datos de AdSense, de DoubleClick ni de Experimentos de contenido. Como han cambiado absolutamente la forma de medirlo, si usamos esta forma tendremos que crear un nuevo perfil, por lo que perderemos todo el histórico de datos. Además, para usar Analytics.js se tendrá que hacer una revisión completa de la implementación actual para adaptarla a todas las funcionalidades ofrecidas.

Así pues, ya veis que no es tan fácil el proceso de transición y la espera se puede hacer más difícil de lo esperado, obligándonos a escoger entre Content Experiments, Remarketing o integración de datos. Seguramente, una vez Universal Analytics sea el código común para todas las webs, ya no serán necesarios tantos cambios. Son tiempos revueltos para Google Analytics, pero se acercan tiempos muy interesantes y el resultado final será fantástico.

Si queréis probar Universal Analytics, podéis hacer la solicitud en el siguiente formulario_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf294738f»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»hacer la solicitud en el siguiente formulario»,»Page»:»Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics»}]);.

Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2947452″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics»,»Page»:»Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics»}]); es un post de Trucos Google Analytics_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2947515″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Trucos Google Analytics»,»Page»:»Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics»}]);.

The post Se acercan tiempos interesantes para Google Analytics appeared first on Trucos Google Analytics.


Source: http://feeds.feedburner.com/TrucosGoogleAnalytics-Optimizer

Categorías
Google Analytics Summit Novedades Universal Analytics

Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View

https://m4p.es/novedades-sobre-google-analytics-directamente-desde-mountain-view/ Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View 2012-11-06 14:00:56 admin Blog post Google Analytics Summit Novedades Universal Analytics bootstrap

Volvemos del Google Analytics Summit 2012_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf29721af»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Google Analytics Summit 2012″,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]); y tenemos tantas noticias para vosotros que no sabemos por dónde empezar! Algunas reflexiones ya habéis podido leerlas en nuestro blog de Webanaltics.es_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2972291″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»nuestro blog de Webanaltics.es»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]); donde Pere Rovira presentaba su punto de vista sobre los cambios_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf297237c»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Pere Rovira presentaba su punto de vista sobre los cambios»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]); que se avecinan.

Google Analytics Summit 2012

Ahora toca pensar en cómo nos van a afectar esos cambios. ¿Cómo van a alternar nuestro trabajo de analistas?

¿Qué podemos esperar de bueno y de malo? ¿Listos? ¡Empezamos!

Universal Analytics

Universal Analytics_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf297244f»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Universal Analytics»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]); es la noticia más importante de todo el Summit de este año. ¿Qué es exactamente? Pues en dos palabras significa cambiar el paradigma de la herramienta – enfocarla en usuario, hacer su seguimiento a través de diferentes canales / dispositivos e incorporar datos externos sobre él, como por ejemplo, una compra offline.

¿Qué beneficios tiene esto? Pues, hay muchos y muy importantes. Vamos a poder:

  • Entender cuál es la convergencia de negocio offline y online
  • Analizar cómo y por qué los usuarios se convierten en usuarios fieles
  • Saber qué hacen los usuarios en cada canal, cómo los canales afectan la conversión final, y de ahí diseñar una estrategia de marketing más eficaz
  • Segmentar los usuarios según los datos de nuestro CRM y cruzarlo con su actividad online para conocerlos aún mejor. En la versión gratuita de Google Analytics vamos a disponer de 20 Custom Dimensions (equivalente de Variables Personalizadas)

Para la mayoría de nosotros Universal Analytics no va a suponer un gran cambio a nivel de implementación si no vamos a integrar datos externos con Google Analytics. Sin embargo, en cuánto a las métricas, análisis de informes y toma de decisiones – es un giro de 180 grados. Ya que el análisis no se centra en una visita, sino en un usuario. Si queréis saber más detalles sobre el funcionamiento de Universal Analytics os recomiendo el post Universal Analytics: The Next Generation of Google Analytics_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2972533″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Universal Analytics: The Next Generation of Google Analytics»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]); de Justin Cutroni.

Modelos de atribución

La siguiente gran novedad son los modelos de atribución de campañas_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2972619″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»modelos de atribuciu00f3n de campau00f1as»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]);. Hasta ahora sólo disponibles para las cuentas de Google Analytics Premium. ¿Qué hacen? Nos permiten comparar las campañas según diferentes tipos de atribución. Ahora mismo Google Analytics atribuye cada conversión a la última fuente de entrada (excepto el tráfico directo). ¿Pero si asignamos la conversión a cada fuente que interactuó, qué vamos a obtener? ¿Y si aplicamos un modelo que asigna un valor más alto a las fuentes que intervinieron más cerca de la conversión? Hay posibilidades infinitas y todo esto podemos verlo para los últimos 90 días.

¿Cómo nos van a ayudar los modelos de atribución?

  • Distribuir mejor los recursos en diferentes canales / campañas
  • Mejorar el rendimiento y eficacia de las acciones del departamento de marketing
  • Analizar diferentes productos / campañas / tipos de usuarios para saber qué enfoque es el más adecuado para cada caso

¿Os estáis muriendo de ganas de probarlo? Apúntados a la lista para estar entre los primeros que tienen acceso a estos modelos._kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2972717″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»listau00a0para estar entre los primeros que tienen acceso a estos modelos.»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]);

Importar Costes

Gracias al uso de cost data import API, podremos tener (por fin) datos más completos sobre el rendimiento de las campañas. Importando los costes de campañas se podrá calcular su ROI en la herramienta. Y creo que no hace falta explicar nada más. Los departamentos de marketing estarán encantados (hasta que vean los resultados) :)

Si queréis profundizar en el tema, os recomiendo el blog oficial de Google Analytics os explican cómo importar estos datos_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf297280b»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»blog oficial de Google Analytics os explican cu00f3mo importar estos datos»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]);.

Customer Lifetime Value (CLV)

Customer Lifetime Value es una métrica que se introducirá a lo largo de 2013. Nos va a decir cuánto dinero se va a gastar en nuestros productos / servicios un usuario. ¡Muy, muy potente!
¿Cómo nos va a ayudar esta métrica?:
  • Valorar segmentos o todos los usuarios
  • Decidir cuánto gastar en captación de un segmento determinado
  • Decidir cuánto gastar en fidelización de usuarios
  • Clasificar los clientes
  • Medir el éxito de acciones de marketing

Sección de Captación

La sección de Fuentes de tráfico cambiará de nombre y se llamará la sección de captación. ¿Por qué? Porque habrá más enfoque en los resultados, en cómo las diferentes fuentes consiguen captar el usuario y hacerlo interactuar con el site y comprar.

Google Analytics Informe de Captación

La nueva representación de estos informes encaja con lo que lleva evangelizando Avinash Kaushik_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf29728dc»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Avinash Kaushik»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]); desde hace tiempo: Captación – Engagement – Conversiones.

Además nos ofrecerá la posibilidad de agrupar las fuentes, tal y como lo permiten ahora Multi-channel Groupings. Es decir, podremos agrupar por ejemplo todos los afiliados bajo un grupo de “Afiliados”, o cualquier referral desde yahoo.mail como “emailing”, etc. Esto significa un análisis mucho más ágil y rápido.

Seguimiento de apps de móvil

Google Analytics Mobile App Analytics_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf29729b3″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Google Analytics Mobile App Analytics»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]); estará disponible para todos los usuarios que quieran hacer el seguimiento de sus aplicaciones para móvil. De hecho, nosotros ya tenemos acceso ;)

Los informes que se nos propone están adaptados a las métricas específicas de las apps. Por ejemplo podremos ver un informe de App Crashes, Device Overview, Active Users, Engagement Flow, Google Play traffic sources, etc.

Google Analytics Premium en España en 2013

Y por fin, la gran noticia – ¡tendremos Google Analytics Premium_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2972a80″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Google Analytics Premium»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]); en España en 2013! Si todavía no sabéis muy bien qué beneficios os puede aportar el cambio para la versión de pago, os dejo este post: Ya es oficial: Google Analytics Premium!_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2972b59″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Ya es oficial: Google Analytics Premium!»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]);

Hemos cubierto los cambios más importantes, pero habrán más y os iremos contando a lo largo de tiempo sobre cada novedad del señor Google. ¡Seguid con nosotros!_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2972c1e»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:» u00a1Seguid con nosotros!»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]);

Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2972ce4″,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]); es un post de Trucos Google Analytics_kmq.push([«trackClickOnOutboundLink»,»link_56b1cf2972daf»,»Article link clicked»,{«Title»:»Trucos Google Analytics»,»Page»:»Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View»}]);.

The post Novedades sobre Google Analytics directamente desde Mountain View appeared first on Trucos Google Analytics.


Source: http://feeds.feedburner.com/TrucosGoogleAnalytics-Optimizer